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Probate

Probate

Probate is the process of dealing with the estate of someone who has died. A Grant of Representation is required to give you the legal right to deal with the deceased’s assets. 

An asset can be anything from a gold watch to a property if there is a property to be sold to enable the distribution of liquid assets among beneficiaries. A grant of probate is required, granting you the legal authority to proceed with the property sale. As probate property lawyers, we offer our Swift Probate Package to efficiently guide you through this legal process.

 

When there is a valid Will, the Grant is issued to the Executors by the Probate Court, and it is called a Grant of Probate. 

 

If there is no Will, the Grant is issued to the next of kin under the Rule of Intestacy, and it is called a Grant of Letters of Administration.

Here at RG Law, we pride ourselves on being experts in Probate law. Our team of specialist probate lawyers in our Sidcup (SE London) and York (North Yorkshire) offices are on hand to help you with any questions and make this journey as easy as possible.

​The Probate process is governed by law and usually includes the following:

  • Settling all the debts and expenses.

  • Obtaining the Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration from the Probate Registry.

  • Determining the assets of the deceased and their value.

  • Paying the gifts as directed by the Will

  • Distributing what remains of the estate to the beneficiaries in accordance with the Will or the Rules of Intestacy (if there is no Will)

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  • Preparing Estate Accounts.

  • Closing accounts and collecting in the assets.

  • Ascertaining whether there is enough money available to pay the deceased's debts.

  • Completing Inheritance Tax Forms for HMRC confirming if any tax is payable

  • If Inheritance Tax is due, settling the payment with HMRC (all or part payment needs to be paid before the Grant of Probate is issued) 

Probate can often be a complicated process that comes at a time when you are already dealing with a devastating event in your life.  It is recommended that you seek help from an experienced Probate Solicitor or Probate Lawyer. Our wills and probate Lawyers have dealt with probate transactions across the UK and can support you, your family and your loved ones through this process and will provide an understanding and sensitive approach, ensuring that matters are completed quickly and efficiently.

If you want to know more, click here to start the process Or you may require one of our Wills and Probate services. See below. Alternatively, you can contact a specialist in our Sidcup or York office to discuss things further.

"As the old saying goes, 'Failing to plan is planning to fail.' And there's no room for error when protecting your assets and ensuring they're distributed as per your wishes after you're gone. That's where having a will comes into play – and not just any will but one drafted by a specialist wills lawyer.

We delve into why having a will is crucial, what could go wrong if you don't have one, and the role of a qualified lawyer or solicitor in this process. We'll also explore the risks associated with DIY wills and the importance of secure storage for your valuable documents"

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Probate is the process of dealing with the estate of someone who has died. A Grant of Representation is required to give you the legal right to deal with the deceased’s assets. 

An asset can be anything from a gold watch to a property if there is a property to be sold to enable the distribution of liquid assets among beneficiaries. A grant of probate is required, granting you the legal authority to proceed with the property sale. 

Navigating the world of legal documents can feel like trying to decipher an alien language. But when it comes to safeguarding your future, understanding lasting power of attorney (LPA) is crucial. Our wills and probate lawyers are experts and can provide advice that can make all the difference to your and your family's future.

This legal document allows you to appoint someone you trust to make decisions on your behalf should you lose mental capacity in the future. 

LPA Lasting Power of Attorney
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We often imagine that managing wealth is a leisurely stroll in the park. It's not all about sipping champagne on yachts; there's a whole world of trust law, succession planning and asset protection to navigate. That's where professional trust lawyers and solicitors come into play.
 
We can help you with various trusts, from setting up a trust to help reduce the amount of inheritance tax your children or grandchildren may be liable to pay should you die.

"When you purchase a property with another person, you can hold it in one of two ways: as tenants in common or as joint tenants. While both options have their own advantages, joint tenancy can be particularly beneficial when it comes to estate planning.

 

However, if you're considering severing a joint tenancy due to a relationship breakdown or for tax purposes, there are important legal considerations to keep in mind before you serve a notice of severance. This is where RG Law comes in"

There may come a time in our lives when we lack the capacity to make decisions for ourselves, maybe due to an unexpected illness, accident, disability or dementia.  This is where your lasting power of attorney (LPA) provides you peace of mind; like your car insurance, it's in the drawer, and you hope your loved ones will never have to use it. 

However, if you are seeking help, support and advice on how you are going to help a friend or family member by becoming a deputy for them because they do not have an LPA in place, we can advise on a possible Court of Protection Deputyship.

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Inheritance tax is an important topic for anyone who may be receiving an inheritance in the future.

 

Whether the inheritance is coming from a spouse or civil partner, family member, or life insurance policy, it is essential to understand how much you may have to pay and what exemptions are available regarding inheritance tax. 

 

In all cases, a lawyer or solicitor specialising in this area of law is the key to getting the best advice.

Probate Get in Touch

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